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What's on at Burton Manor Gardens - Cheshire
  • What's in the gardens month by month - the whole year in separate months, on this page.
  • General activities, open events, fun days etc, - takes you to see the charity's website at Burton Manor Gardens do org dot uk
  • IN THE GARDEN NOW
    What is there to see in the Glass House and Walled Garden Project?
    NOTES- Atelier is the small cafe on the left as you enter the main gate. The Walled Garden is some way further left (east) of the main gate, but accessed from the same route, closer to the road than the main Manor entrance. The orchard is to the right of the main gate.
    MAY
    JUNE
    JULY
    AUGUST
    SEPTEMBER
    OCTOBER
    NOVEMBER
    DECEMBER
    JANUARY
    FEBRUARY
    MARCH
    APRIL

    VISITORS ARE ADVISED THAT IN WINDY WEATHER THERE MAY BE A RISK OF INJURY FROM FALLING BRANCHES AND THAT USING THE PERIMETER PATH IN SUCH CONDITIONS MAY BE ESPECIALLY DANGEROUS.

    MAY -

    ATELIER
    The fragrant, white flowers on Choisya ternate will scent the air with their citrus-like fragrance on sunny days. Crush a leaf and get the strongly aromatic smell of this close relative of oranges and lemons.

    WALLED GARDEN
    In the shade bed behind the glasshouse look to the tall, pink spikes of Elephant ears, Bergenia crassifolia and the deep purple of Primula pulverulenta from China. Here too is Dicentra spectabilis sometimes known as "Lady in the bath." Do you know why?
    The auricula theatre, in the west of the walled garden, is probably at its best at the begining of May. This is many varieties of Primula auricula, displayed in a fashion invented by the Victorians.

    VEGETABLE GARDEN
    Broad beans are flowering now and beetroot, lettuce and peas are germinating. On the far side a small seedbed has been sown with leeks and brassicas both showing above the ground; once large enough to handle these will be planted into their final positions.

    FRUIT GARDEN
    Strawberries in flower will need pollinating insects to visit to ensure a good crop.

    GLASSHOUSE
    As the days lengthen and become warmer plants will be moved out into cold frames, against the far wall, to harden-off. These include Dahlias and beans. Cuttings are still being taken to ensure continuance of some plants.

    LEAVE THE GARDEN BY THE ARCHED GATEWAY
    Go over the drive and past a group of deciduous rhododendrons. Note the fine scent of the yellow, Rhododendron luteum from the Pontic Mountains. Proceed along the shale path noting the fine Horse Chesnut with its candles of flowers promising a good crop of conkers in the Autumn and continue with views across the sheep meadows to the River Dee. Here, by the path side, are wild flowers, Red campion and bluebells.
    Passing the Ice House, open now that the bats have left their winter roost, you will come up towards the orchard past yellow Berberis x stenophylla, on the left, pink and white Malus floribunda and the big trusses of Rhododendron x loderi to the right.

    ORCHARD
    As you enter the orchard glance to your right and you will see a blue haze from the self-sown Forget-Me-Not under the sycamore trees. The flowers of the fruit trees will be fading now but the bees should have done their important work and we await the outcome and an autumn of lip-smacking fruitfulness.

    JUNE -

    ATELIER
    Self -sown seedlings of Valerian, Centranthus rubra ,a plant of Roman origin, are livening up the base of the walls. A Fire Thorn also provides muted colour now to produce red fruits in autumn.

    STABLE YARD
    The newly landscaped beds are yet to reach their full potential, but already blue Iris siberica is showing promise and there will be other shrubs contributing to the effect as the month progresses.

    WALLED GARDEN
    In the shade bed behind the glasshouse look for the tall, deep purple flowers of Primula pulverulenta from China interplanted with the burnt orange of Primula bulleyana.
    Over the low wall of the dismantled lean-to glasshouse, Tomatoes, Dahlias and Chrysanthemums have been set ut where the reflected warmth will ensure good yields of fruit and flowers into the summer and autumn. The Edwardians would have welcomed cut-flowers for the house raised in this way.

    VEGETABLE GARDEN
    Broad beans are flowering and their tops will be pinched-out soon to avoid attack from Blackfly, a notable pest. Look in the individual allotments at the bottom of the walled garden and you will see an attractive, red flowered variety of Broad Bean.
    Lettuce are maturing, peas and beans are climbing and a few rows of brassicas have been transplanted from the seed beds into their final positions under the protective netting.

    FRUIT GARDEN
    There has been a good set of fruit on the strawberries which are now nesting on a bed of straw, so a bumper harvest may be anticipated.

    FLOWER GARDEN
    There is colour now from Lupins and Geraniums especially, but also from blue Centaurea Montana and Iris siberica.

    LEAVE THE GARDEN BY THE ARCHED GATEWAY
    Go over the drive and through to where, under the Copper Beech, planted to commemorate the Battle of Waterloo, the Sunken Garden is being restored by volunteers. Go through the latticework gate on your right and along the front of the Manor where on the north wall a large pale lilac Wisteria is in full flower. At its base, Fire Thorn, Pyracanthus rodgersiana, shows white blooms against the wall and nearby the red flowers of Wiegela "Eva Rathke" is looking particularly fine.

    NORTH MANOR GARDEN to the rear of the stable block.
    Most people will be pleased to see the fish are back in the formal pond along with the occasional frog and newt. Perhaps you would care to relax before the production of The Merry Wives of Windsor on Friday 16th June and have your picnic here. Check out the Dragonflies with their brilliant colourings and glistening wings of blue and red and the Damsel-flies with their slender bodies. How can you tell them apart? Watch carefully as they settle on the plants. The damsel-flies hold their two pairs of similar wings vertically over their abdomen when at rest and have a fluttering flight. The dragonflies tend to be stronger in flight and hold their two pairs of dissimilar wings at right-angles to the body when at rest.

    VISITORS ARE ADVISED THAT IN WINDY WEATHER THERE MAY BE A RISK OF INJURY FROM FALLING BRANCHES AND THAT USING THE PERIMETER PATH IN SUCH CONDITIONS MAY BE ESPECIALLY DANGEROUS.

    JULY -

    THE NORTH GARDEN July sees the first blooming of water lilies in the pond whilst in the beds under the wall are the creamy plumes of Goat's Beard, Aruncus dioicus, at the other end of the same bed are the red, tubular flowers of the South African, Phygelius aequalis and by
    the steps down to the Manor is the American Escallonia 'Apple Blossom'
    STABLE YARD. Red Valerian and the white Shasta Daisy, Leucanthemum x superbum, are showing colour; many varieties of the latter were raised at the now defunct Taudevin's Wirral Nursery
    WALLED GARDEN Pass into the garden past tubs of red, white and blue annuals and beds of brightly coloured flowers planted for those with a visual handicap.
    Vegetable Garden. Broad Beans are setting as are the yellow podded, Victorian pea. Lettuce is maturing, peas and beans are climbing and a
    few rows of brassicas have been transplanted from the seedbeds into their final positions under protective netting. Courgettes are already in
    flower; note that some flowers are male whilst the females bear immature fruits below the flowers. Nasturtiums add a touch of colour to salads and to the garden's central pathway.
    Fruit Garden Wimbledon fortnight could not be recognised without the strawberries which have been enjoyed by hard-working volunteers.
    Flower garden. There is colour now from Lupins and Geraniums especially, but also from blue Centaurea montana and many other herbaceous perennials. Sweet Peas need regular picking to encourage new flowers to develop in succession

    LEAVE THE GARDEN BY THE ARCHED GATEWAY

    Go over the drive and through to where, under the Copper Beech, planted to commemorate the Battle of Waterloo, the Sunken Garden is being restored by volunteers .Go through the lattice-work gate on your right past white-flowered Hydrangeas, descend the steps and turn right. By the Orangery to where you will see another Escallonia 'Apple Blossom' and tall spikes of Bears' Breeches, Acanthus mollis, the plant that Greeks, or was it Romans, used as inspiration for their decorative architecture? An old red-flowered Escallonia is in full flower at the opposite end of thee terrace, above the Croquet Lawn. This is possibly the old hybrid E. 'C.F.Beale' All Escallonia make excellent subjects for seaside planting as they are able to withstand salt-laden winds
    Against the wall of Berhend House, the brick building under the trees, is a magnificent
    rambling rose. It is most probably Rosa filipes a native of western China and the variety is likely to be R.f. 'Kifstgate'

    AUGUST -

    THE NORTH GARDEN Water Lilies continue their display and the expanding leaves shade the surface keeping algal growth to a minimum. At the foot of the steps leading down to the Manor's front door, scrambling stems of the everlasting sweet pea are now bearing
    flowers in shades of pink
    STABLE YARD. The white Shasta Daisy, Leucanthemum x superbum, maintains its flowering quality and nearby are the chrome yellow flowers of a prostrate. fleshy-leaved sedum suited to the dry conditions found here. A pink-flowered Hebe from New Zealand and a low Persicaria from the Himalaya contribute colour to this recent development
    WALLED GARDEN Pass into the garden past tubs of red, white and blue annuals and beds of brightly coloured flowers planted for those with a visual handicap.
    Vegetable Garden. This year?s harvest is well under way with crops of Broad Bean, Peas and Courgette being gathered on a regular basis. Note the yellow-podded pea, an old Victorian variety with unusual lavender coloured flowers. Onions, planted as sets last autumn have been lifted and placed on the drying frame to ripen so that they might store well for later use.
    Fruit Garden Much of the soft fruit, Raspberries and Strawberries, is finished and the Bush Fruits are too immature to fruit this year.
    Flower garden. A blaze of colour greets those who move beyond the vegetables and close inspection will reveal a wealth of traditional herbaceous varieties
    LEAVE THE GARDEN BY THE ARCHED GATEWAY
    Go over the drive and follow the path into the Sunken Garden past the pink, bush rose, "Ballerina." Below the walls misty white flowers on
    Masterwort may be seen , a plant in the carrot family. Apiacaeae. Leaving here by the sandstone portico, between banks of pink, blue and white Hydrangeas, turn right towards the Manor where Acanthus mollis, known as Bears? Breeches ( does anyone know why? ) raises its two metre high, bracted inflorescences. The shape of the leaves was used extensively to decorate buildings in Greek and Roman architecture.
    Bright red flowers on Crocosmia "Lucifer" create a striking contrast to white Agapanthus from South Africa. Towards the end of the month beyond the Croquet Lawn, single, white flowers bedeck the tall, evergreen Eucryphya x nymansenis "Nymansay" one of the best plants in the region for late summer colour.
    Turn right along the Manor's west wall, through the gate, across the drive and up the steps into the North Garden once more.

    VISITORS ARE ADVISED THAT IN WINDY WEATHER THERE MAY BE A RISK OF INJURY FROM FALLING BRANCHES AND THAT USING THE PERIMETER PATH IN SUCH CONDITIONS MAY BE ESPECIALLY DANGEROUS.

    SEPTEMBER -

    CAFÉ COURTYARD In the tub to your right as you enter is a fine example of the purple-leafed New Zealand Flax, Phormium tenax ’Purpureum‹, its leaf fibres used by New Zealanders for making ropes and twine.
    THE NORTH GARDEN Water Lilies will continue their display until the weather gets colder towards the end of the month. Reed Mace, often referred to as Bullrush, is displaying its chocolate-coloured seed heads and in the opposite corner, purple Lobelia syphilitica makes a muted contribution. Leaves from this plant were made into an infusion by Native Americans to treat sexually transmitted diseases.
    STABLE YARD. A pink-flowered Hebe from New Zealand and a low Persicaria from the Himalaya contribute colour to this recent development, as does a tall, yellow sunflower. This is a perennial species probably Helianthus decapetalatus.
    WALLED GARDEN Walk into the garden past a bed of tropical American annual cosmos, ferny foliage and flowers in various shades of pink and glance right to the raised beds where sunflowers have been planted f to good effect. Once yellow was the only colour for these tall annuals but now shades of red and mahogany extend the colour range
    Vegetable Garden. Broad Beans and peas have completed their cycle to be replaced by Runner Beans, Courgettes and Sweet Corn, the latter planted in blocks to ensure good cob production as the tassel-like male flowers above drop pollen onto the developing female cobs below
    Fruit Garden Autumn fruiting Raspberries and some late strawberries will make a final effort to keep the interest going here. In time there will be other cane fruits and bush fruits but these are still too young for fruit production.
    Flower garden. A blaze of colour still greets those who move beyond the vegetables and close inspection will reveal a wealth of traditional herbaceous varieties

    LEAVE THE GARDEN BY THE ARCHED GATEWAY
    Go over the drive and follow the path into the Sunken Garden to leave by the sandstone portico, between banks of pink, blue and white Hydrangeas, turn right towards the Manor with its walls covered in creeper now showing promise of autumn colour. Below the walls are the silver leaves of Senecio cineraria whose yellow daisy flowers possess no real merit
    ORCHARD Some of the old trees are carrying a crop which will form the basis of the Apple Days to be held at The Manor on October 20th and 21st. This promises to be a wonderful occasion and will be the first of its kind on Wirral.

    OCTOBER -

    CAFÉ COURTYARD In the tub to your right as you enter is a fine example of the purple-leafed New Zealand Flax, Phormium tenax 'Purpureum.' In contrast is the silver foliage of Senecio cineraria a valuable plant for coastal areas.

    THE NORTH GARDEN Water Lilies may be expected to produce a few flowers until the weather gets colder towards the end of the month.

    STABLE YARD. A tall, yellow sunflower, is a perennial species probably Helianthus decapetalatus. Pyracantha with red-orange fruits and a pale yellow, as yet unnamed rose, may be seen against the back wall.

    WALLED GARDEN Walk into the garden past a bed of tropical American annual cosmos, with ferny foliage and flowers in various shades of pink and turn left across the end of the glasshouse to se a fig, Ficus carrica, The fruit is remarkable in that it encloses the flowers which may only be pollinated by the small Fig Wasp. As this insect is absent in UK no viable seed is ever set. Turn left along the low wall of the old lean-to glasshouse for a fine display of Dahlias
    Vegetable Garden Summer vegetables are over now but we may look forward to crops in the Brassica range, Cabbages, Sprouts and Broccoli, to Leeks and, perhaps, a few late maturing salad crops, Lettuce and Radish
    Flower garden. Splashes of colour still greet those who move beyond the vegetables and close inspection will reveal a wealth of traditional herbaceous varieties especially Michaelmas Daisies, species of perennial Aster.

    LEAVE THE GARDEN BY THE ARCHED GATEWAY
    Go over the drive and follow the path into the Sunken Garden to leave by the sandstone portico, between banks of Hydrangeas, which will retain their flowers well into the winter months ’though
    colour will fade in time. Turn right towards the Manor with its walls covered in creeper now showing promise of autumn colour.

    ORCHARD The harvest of fruit from some of the old trees takes place around now.

    VISITORS ARE ADVISED THAT IN WINDY WEATHER THERE MAY BE A RISK OF INJURY FROM FALLING BRANCHES AND THAT USING THE PERIMETER PATH IN SUCH CONDITIONS MAY BE ESPECIALLY DANGEROUS.

    NOVEMBER -

    Please Note- bats start to hibernate about now so the Ice House will be closed when bats are in it.
    CAFÉ COURTYARD Most of the interest and colour here centres around variegated evergreens notably the so-called laurel, Aucuba japonica 'Variegata' with its cream-spotted leaves and the New Zealand Griselinia littoralis 'Variegata' with its white-margined foliage. The latter is a fine subject for coastal planting as its specific epithet suggests'
    STABLE YARD. The tall, yellow sunflower, a perennial species probably Helianthus decapetalatus. and a Fire Thorn with red-orange fruits add colour to this area opposite the craft units.
    WALLED GARDEN Walk into the garden past the Visitor Centre and enjoy the sheltered calm away from November's chilly winds.
    Glasshouse The potted plants, which stood outside through summer, need winter protection and have been brought in before the frosts can damage them. A collection of cacti has arrived, refugees, from Ness Gardens; we shall care for them here until a new unit is built for them up the road at Ness. A fine example of inter-garden co-operation
    Vegetable Brassicas such as, Cabbages, Sprouts and Broccoli, and Leeks, make up the bulk of winter vegetables. Beans have been harvested as seed for next year and the ground that they and others occupied left fallow to be prepared for next year's crops.
    Flower garden. Splashes of colour still greet those who move beyond the vegetables and close inspection will reveal a few late flowering stalwarts including the delicate Aster ericoides with its small white and pink flowers which are held in such abundance as to almost hide the leaves. In the corner by the compost heaps the feathery seed heads of Clematis tangutica will shine on sunny days and below is the 'Bug Hotel' with fruiting bodies of fungi, brown 'Jews Ear'; white 'Candle Snuff'; orange 'Coral Spot' and a small, fawn-coloured, puff ball.
    LEAVE THE GARDEN BY THE ARCHED GATEWAY
    Cross the drive into the Sunken Garden where work concentrates on the hedges to bring them down to a manageable size. Outside, Hollies are carrying their shiny, red fruits soon to be eaten by birds, and the fallen leaves of the Garden's trees make a carpet of yellows and browns and a satisfying 'scrunchy' noise as you walk. Follow the shale path past the Ice House, now closed to protect hibernating butterflies and on to the front door of the Manor past an 'igloo' of willow stems to enter the North Garden by a flight of steps
    THE NORTH GARDEN Pink Viburnum x bodnantense against the wall of Newton House and evergreen Abelia grandiflora below Squirrel Lodge are now in full flower.

    DECEMBER -

    Please Note- The Ice House is closed due to hibernating bats.
    CAFÉ COURTYARD Outstanding this month is the white stemmed Birch, Betula utilis var jacquemontii ’Inverleith' Native to the Himalaya and western China this variable species tends towards brown stems at the eastern end of its natural range whilst in the west it has white trunks.
    STABLE YARD. Two ericaceous plants, Rhododendron and Pieris, both requiring acid soils, are in bud giving promise of a good display next spring. The purple-leafed sage, Salvia officinalis ’Purpurea' is just as good for making the traditional stuffing for the Christmas bird as is its grey leafed counterpart and some believe it to be more attractive.
    WALLED GARDEN Walk into the garden past the Visitor Centre and experience the warmth that shelter from wind and reflected heat from the sun may bring. It is easier to understand the thinking behind walled gardens at the year's end than at any other time.
    Glasshouse Many of the so called hot house plants, will continue to grow so long as light and temperature reach the required levels.
    Vegetable Brassicas such as, Cabbages, Sprouts and Broccoli, and Leeks, make up the bulk of winter vegetables. The new trench for Runner Beans has been dug to be filled with rich compost for next year and a general tidying-up is under way to ensure that good hygiene reduces the incidence of pest and disease attacks.
    Flower garden. Many herbaceous plants have begun their dormant period and the dead stems will be cut to ground level. Some may have been left, for the effect of frost on branching stems can be a fine sight on cold mornings. A quintet of cold frames has been provided with covers to protect those plants that are at risk in winter from excess moisture but capable of withstanding cold.
    LEAVE THE GARDEN BY THE ARCHED GATEWAY
    Cross the drive into the Sunken Garden where work concentrates on the hedges to bring them down to a manageable size The Waterloo Beech has had some branches removed to create a safer and more balanced appearance and to allow light into the area. It is important to manage trees skilfully to ensure continued good health.
    In an angle on the west wall of the Manor the familiar winter jasmine Jasminum nudiflorum, is showing its bright, yellow blossoms.
    The Orchard Area A portion of land below the Orchard has been cleared of grass by machine as a first step to creating a wild flower meadow. Watch this area as the plan develops over the years to provide colour and food for birds, insects and small mammals
    THE NORTH GARDEN Pink Viburnum x bodnantense against the wall of Newton House is still in full flower.

    JANUARY -

    Please Note- The Ice House is closed due to hibernating bats.
    Not surprisingly, evergreens provide the 'backbone' planting in most gardens at this rather bleak time of year.
    CAFÉ COURTYARD Tubs of variegated Griselinia littoralis from New Zealand greet the visitor at the entrance whilst on the surrounding walls grows that great Victorian favourite, laurel, in this instance Aucuba japonica 'Variegata' with its speckled foliage.
    STABLE YARD. Here are young Box, Buxus sempervirens, much loved of topiarists and some small-leafed Euonymus, Euonymus radicans in both yellow and white variegations.
    WALLED GARDEN Walk into the garden past the Visitor Centre and experience the warmth that shelter from wind and reflected heat from the sun may bring.
    Glasshouse- Many of the so called hot house plants, will continue to grow so long as light and temperature reach the required levels.
    Vegetable Brassicas such as, Cabbages, Sprouts and Broccoli, and Leeks, make up the bulk of winter vegetables but, inevitably, the vegetable garden looks a little sad at this time of year. Soon compost from our own bins will be spread to replace the nutrients used by last year's crops and the cycle will begin again with the sowing of Broad Beans towards the month's end.
    Flower garden. In the long border behind the glasshouse the large oval leaves of Bergenias show their variations as some remain green whilst other take on a more attractive, reddish hue. A single plant of a variegated Sedge, Carex morrowii 'Variegata' adds further interest together with the white-veined Arum italicum 'Pictum.' There are several evergreen ferns in the Fernery.
    LEAVE THE GARDEN BY THE ARCHED GATEWAY
    Cross the drive into the Sunken Garden where In the centre, surrounded by a low Box hedge is a tall Yew, Taxus baccata 'Fastigiata' and across the far side a row of trimmed Box stand in front of a tall hedge of Holly and Yew. Hedges abound and as you cross in front of the Manor you will see clipped Yew framing flower beds, sadly no longer planted as they would have been in bygone times. Low down in front of the wall is Iris unguicularis with its violet, short-lived blooms and if you turn right beneath the impressive foliage of the evergreen Magnolia grandiflora then right again past Behrend House you will see the flowering spectacle that is Hamamelis mollis 'Pallida' in full and glorious flower
    Walk towards the Manor entrance past more laurel, with a silvery variegation in this instance, and the grey- leaved daisy bush, Brachyglotti and up the steps into the North Garden.
    THE NORTH GARDEN Pink Viburnum x bodnantense against the wall of Newton House is still in full flower and the tubs contain yet more evergreens, Box again but this time with rusty colouration in their leaves.

    FEBRUARY -

    Please Note- The Ice House is closed due to hibernating bats.
    CAFÉ COURTYARD In a corner under the wall a tub of Laurustinus, Viburnum tinus, is showing its pink-budded white flowers. As yet there is no sign of the damage that may be done by Viburnum Beetle.

    Pass across the Stable Yard and into the Walled Garden

    WALLED GARDEN
    Glasshouse Many of the so called hot house plants, will continue to grow as light and temperature reach the required levels. Cacti have no leaves these having been modified into spines, and the swollen, water retentive, green stems take on the task of photosynthesis usually performed by the foliage. Both characteristics are a defence against arid conditions.
    Vegetables- By spreading compost and well-rotted manure nutrient levels can be increased and a system of rotation ensures that pest and disease is kept to a minimum; both are necessary for success. Most of the Brassicas have now been harvested and Broad Beans have been sown.
    Fruit- New raspberry canes have been planted to compliment the autumn fruiting variety a survivor from earlier times. Both have been mulched with manure to encourage heavy cropping. Bush fruits, yet to fully establish, have been pruned to good shapes. Already our thoughts turn to warmer days and a fine summer!
    Flower garden- In the long border behind the glasshouse the Lenten Rose, Helleborus x hybridus, is opening its long-lasting flowers in shades of burgundy, white and pink-ish.

    LEAVE THE GARDEN BY THE ARCHED GATEWAY
    Cross the drive into the Sunken Garden. where work continues with the planting of a linear bed of the highly fragrant deciduous Rhododendron luteum from the Caucasus. This is planting for the future but in a year or two we should begin to see, and smell, their yellow blossoms. Low down in front of the Manor wall Iris unguicularis continues its spasmodic flowering .On the opposite side of the formal gardens, under a Magnolia; double snowdrops are making a fine show.
    Energetic volunteers have been using wood from the felled Sycamore to provide rustic seating See how many you can find.
    To the left of the Orchard snowdrops and crocus push up into daylight and soon spring will be here.

    THE NORTH GARDEN Pink Viburnum x bodnantense against the wall of Newton House is still in full flower.

    VISITORS ARE ADVISED THAT IN WINDY WEATHER THERE MAY BE A RISK OF INJURY FROM FALLING BRANCHES AND THAT USING THE PERIMETER PATH IN SUCH CONDITIONS MAY BE ESPECIALLY DANGEROUS.

    MARCH

    Please Note- The Ice House is closed due to hibernating bats.
    CAFÉ COURTYARD In a corner under the wall a tub of Laurustinus, Viburnum tinus, is showing its pink-budded white flowers. As yet no there is no sign of the damage that may be done by Viburnum Beetle.
    Pass across the Stable Yard and into the Walled Garden
    WALLED GARDEN
    Glasshouse- Many of the so called hot house plants, will continue to grow as light and temperature reach the required levels. Seedlings of various flowers and vegetables have begun to germinate in the protected environment of the glasshouse and tubers of Dahlias are now sprouting ready for cuttings to be taken
    Vegetable All last year's crops have been cleared ready for the ground to be prepared for another productive season. hygiene is important in order to avoid attack from pests and diseases and with this in mind all remaining vegetation has been carefully removed.
    Flower garden. In the long border behind the glasshouse the Lenten Rose, Helleborus x hybridus, is opening its long-lasting flowers in shades of burgundy, white and pink.
    The first auriculas come into flower some time in March and these will be put on display in as it happens in the auricula theatre, in the west of the walled garden.
    The Herb Garden, alongside the fence, emphasises the value of plants as a human resource.
    LEAVE THE GARDEN BY THE ARCHED GATEWAY
    Cross the drive into the Sunken Garden and continue into the formal areas where beds have been dug over ready for sowing colourful annuals once the weather warms up. In the less formal areas beyond the front of the Manor, snowdrops are making a significant contribution, the most abundant being double snowdrops, Galanthus nivalis 'Flore Plena' both in areas under trees and in long grass. Snowdrops have become naturalised in many parts of the United Kingdom having been brought to our shores by the Romans, or so it is thought.
    Orchard Area
    Below the orchard, the area previously stripped of turf, is ready to be checked and if necessary sown to top up the flower meadow. Between the meadow and the orchard a large Rhododendron is opening its red flowers: this is Rhododendron x nobleanum an old favourite with Edwardian gardeners.
    To the left of the Orchard snowdrops and crocus are making a colourful display under the Sycamores, heralding the arrival of spring.

    APRIL

    Please Note- The Ice House is usually closed at the start of the month due to hibernating bats, although when they wake up and move on it will open again.
    ATELIER CAFÉ COURTYARD
    Evergreen Choisya ternata will be scenting the area with its white flowers and the Camellias will still be holding their pink flowers above glossy leaves. Magnolia liliflora 'Nigra' will still be in flower frosts permitting.
    WALLED GARDEN Broad Beans, an early maturing vegetable have been planted in double rows in the Vegetable garden and the volunteer gardeners will have made a start on sowing Brassicas and Leeks in the seed beds next to the Fernery where the first bright, green fronds will now be unfurling. Rhubarb is ready for pulling this month and sticks will be available to purchase from the garden A few rows of early lettuce may be just showing above ground.
    Primula auriculas usually are really coming on during April. Visit the auricula theatre, in the west of the walled garden every week to see different varieties flowering at their best.
    GLASSHOUSE For a bit of a warm-up on cold, showery days pop in and look at the range of exotics which require winter protection before being put out in the Mediterranean garden after the threat of frost is past. You may also find seed of Runner Beans and other tender vegetables being started in the warm conditions. Please remember, if the door is closed to shut it again behind you.
    LEAVE THE GARDEN BY THE ARCHED GATEWAY
    Follow the path opposite into the Waterloo Picnic Area noticing swelling flower buds on deciduous rhododendrons, which will be at their best in May, and onto the Dee Estuary Viewing Point. A few lingering flowers on daffodils and the first flowers on Bluebells will provide some colour as you make your way via the Ice House to the Orchard. The Ice House may still be closed as bats use this ancient structure for a winter roost . Return later in the year for a good look at this amazing building. As you leave this area, using the path to the Orchard, ,look to your right for flowers on Malus floribunda in pink and white
    ORCHARD Pruning will have been completed earlier in the year and now the apple trees will be showing swelling, pink-tipped buds, a promise of fruitful harvests to come if the pollinating insects have good weather for their essential work. The Medlar, growing at the bottom of the sloping ground, will perhaps, be in full flower looking like a small, white, single rose; it is a close relative of our wild and garden roses.
    Turn right along the Manor's west wall, through the gate, across the drive and up the steps into the North Garden once more.

    VISITORS ARE ADVISED THAT IN WINDY WEATHER THERE MAY BE A RISK OF INJURY FROM FALLING BRANCHES AND THAT USING THE PERIMETER PATH IN SUCH CONDITIONS MAY BE ESPECIALLY DANGEROUS.

    Links - Friends of Burton Manor Gardens website home page.
    Burton Manor Gardens general re-direction website.
    Co. Ltd. website (the office)- Burton Manor Gardens charity, includes events.
    Burton Ukulele Band song sheets
       

       

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